An excerpt from “The Day Before the Story”

“…Lollie observed the noise their shoes were making. She recognized the hidden significance of the sounds, the clues left behind by the sound of their walk.

Talented detectives know these things“, mused Lollie.

If noises had a smell, all of the noises that bounced off the walls today in the Great House, beginning with the Storm of the Chattering Monkeys up to and including the clamor the women made with their heels, would have a very complex bouquet.

Any DuBois would recognize this immediately.

The bouquet would be best described as the lingering scent of cinnamon cake baking in an oven, competing with the asphyxiating smell of strong patchouli, blending with the pungent tang that freshly watered tomato plant leaves release in the air. All of these notes meshed with the sneeze-inducing, sharp aroma of freshly cut garden grass.

Mind you, these are not scents that were in the air at that time. They were the scents that the noise gave off.

Yes, the DuBois were very sensitive to smells. They could smell noise.

Yes.”…

from The Day Before The Story (The DuBois Family Saga, Book 1)

STAY TUNED…THE LAUNCH IS APPROACHING.

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one that reads like a surreal painting?

a family saga filled with eccentric characters?

historical fiction and magical realism?

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Free excerpt

This is from one of my unpublished books whose story spans over many decades and cultures. It looks at the more intricate details about everyday moments that go on behind closed doors in order to capture the essence of their lives.

From The Key (c) by Suzy Valtsioti

“Just another day in their life.

Actually, just another day in their lives would be more accurate.

Their lives were housed ‘together’ but they remained ‘separate’. If sharing common space and possessing legal papers that declared a marriage took place makes two people a couple, then you can call them a couple. A noisy couple made up of two rather opposite individuals.

Most of the time they are at each other’s throats. Their sparring is practically continuous, interrupted only by their “moments of quiet”.

Moments of quiet in their home aren’t peaceful or serene.

If you define ‘moments of quiet’ as rather peaceful moments leading to conflict resolution – as moments that allow for one to catch their breath or to calmly think things through – then your idea of ‘moments of quiet’ are not what this couple experience.

Their ‘moments of quiet’ hardly allow for them to approach one another in a calmer state of mind. No.

Their ‘moments of quiet’ are like black clouds looming over their heads threatening to hurl and lash yet another storm like no other.

These quiet moments, when they arrive, cloak their rooms like a weighty veil.

They are both aware of this suffocating pressure change in the air when these moments arise. They have always felt it all these years.

Their ‘moments of quiet’ bore a silence that was tense and threatening. The both of them probably don’t know which is worse, their arguing or the morose silence in between the wars. And that perception is probably one of the few things that these two people had in common.

Continue reading “Free excerpt”

perspectives…

https://www.authorspublish.com/

art.

writing is the painting of the voice.

voltaire
Nicolas de Largillière, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

that simple!

“All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”

the fellowship of the ring, j. r. r. tolkein

just keep on reading…

Susanna Clarke’s Labyrinthine ‘Piranesi’ Will Lock You In : NPR

by Ari Shapiro

Her latest is called Piranesi ­­– that’s also her narrator’s name — and his whole world is a strange, labyrinthine house. His name comes from a real-life person, Giovanni Battista Piranesi, an 18th-century architect and artist. “He did some engravings of fantastic prisons which have haunted my imagination for a long time,” Clarke says. “They could possibly be real places, but quite dark and looming. I must admit, I kind of want to go to those fantastic prisons … and I want to walk around. … They’re meant to be gloomy, but I find them quite attractive.” The fictional Piranesi explores the massive halls lined with towering statues. He catches fish in the oceans that roar through rooms down below. He’s at home in this mysterious house. “He’s in a very strange and in some ways inhospitable place, but he doesn’t feel it’s inhospitable,” Clarke explains. “It is a meaningful place. The statues and the house all feel generally overwhelmingly benevolent to him and he feels like he is in communion with them, like he is sort of almost having a conversation with the world in which he finds himself.”…

Susanna Clarke’s Labyrinthine ‘Piranesi’ Will Lock You In : NPR
image from Bloomsbury Press on Home Sweet Labyrinth: Susanna Clarke’s Mysterious ‘Piranesi’ Will Lock You In

Life is not like water. Things in life don’t necessarily flow over the shortest possible route.”Haruki Murakami

image : nappa / CC BY (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)